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Presley DE-371 - History

Presley DE-371 - History

Presley

(DE-371: dp. 1,745 (f.); 1. 306'0"; b. 36'7", dr. 13'4", s. 24 k.

cpl. 222; a. 2 5", 6 40mm., 2 det., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 3 21" tt.; cl. John C. Butler)

Presley (DE-371) was laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd., Orange, Tex., 6 June 1944; launched 19 August 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Willie Lynn Presley, and commissioned 7 November 1944, Lt. Comdr. Richard S. Paret, USNR, in command.

After shakedown off Bermuda, Presley transited the Panama Canal 24 January 1945 and proceeded to Pearl Harbor for further training. She arrived at Noumea 22 March, and departed 3 May to escort a group of transports to Leyte Gulf. She subsequently touched at Manus, Saipan, and Ulithi before making two trips to Okinawa. The end of the war found her anchored in Ulithi Harbor.

On 19 September Presley proceeded to Guam for duty making two trips to Truk where she served as harbor patrol and station ship pending the occupation of that enemy post by U.S. forces. On 5 November the ship was ordered to the United States to be placed in an inactive status. Presley decommissioned 20 June 1946, and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet berthed at San Diego. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 30 June 1968.


Elvis Presley

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Elvis Presley, in full Elvis Aaron Presley or Elvis Aron Presley (see Researcher’s Note), (born January 8, 1935, Tupelo, Mississippi, U.S.—died August 16, 1977, Memphis, Tennessee), American popular singer widely known as the “King of Rock and Roll” and one of rock music’s dominant performers from the mid-1950s until his death.

Who first recorded Elvis Presley?

Producer Sam Phillips at Sun Records, a local blues label, was the first to record Elvis Presley. He responded to Presley's audition tape with a phone call, and several week's of recording sessions ensued with a band consisting of Presley, guitarist Scotty Moore, and bassist Bill Black. Their repertoire consisted of blues and country songs and gospel hymns.

What is the name of Elvis Presley’s estate?

Graceland is Elvis Presley's estate in Memphis, Tennessee, and remains one of the the U.S.'s top tourist attractions.

How did Elvis Presley die?

Elvis Presley died of a heart attack in 1977 brought on largely by drug abuse. He was 42 years old.

Was Elvis Presley drafted into the army?

In early 1958 Elvis Presley was drafted by the U.S. Army. Presley returned from the army in 1960, where he had served as a soldier in Germany rather than joining the Special Services entertainment division.

Who was Elvis Presley's manager?

Colonel Tom Parker was a Dutch-born American show business promoter who was best known for managing the career of Elvis Presley.

Presley grew up dirt-poor in Tupelo, moved to Memphis as a teenager, and, with his family, was off welfare only a few weeks when producer Sam Phillips at Sun Records, a local blues label, responded to his audition tape with a phone call. Several weeks worth of recording sessions ensued with a band consisting of Presley, guitarist Scotty Moore, and bassist Bill Black. Their repertoire consisted of the kind of material for which Presley would become famous: blues and country songs, Tin Pan Alley ballads, and gospel hymns. Presley knew some of this music from the radio, some of it from his parents’ Pentecostal church and the group sings he attended at the Rev. H.W. Brewster’s Black Memphis church, and some of it from the Beale Street blues clubs he began frequenting as a teenager.

Presley was already a flamboyant personality, with relatively long greased-back hair and wild-coloured clothing combinations, but his full musical personality did not emerge until he and the band began playing with blues singer Arthur (“Big Boy”) Crudup’s song “That’s All Right Mama” in July 1954. They arrived at a startling synthesis, eventually dubbed rockabilly, retaining many of the original’s blues inflections but with Presley’s high tenor voice adding a lighter touch and with the basic rhythm striking a much more supple groove. This sound was the hallmark of the five singles Presley released on Sun over the next year. Although none of them became a national hit, by August 1955, when he released the fifth, “ Mystery Train,” arguably his greatest record ever, he had attracted a substantial Southern following for his recordings, his live appearances in regional roadhouses and clubs, and his radio performances on the nationally aired Louisiana Hayride. (A key musical change came when drummer D.J. Fontana was added, first for the Hayride shows but also on records beginning with “Mystery Train.”)

Presley’s management was then turned over to Colonel Tom Parker, a country music hustler who had made stars of Eddy Arnold and Hank Snow. Parker arranged for Presley’s song catalog and recording contract to be sold to major New York City-based enterprises, Hill and Range and RCA Victor, respectively. Sun received a total of $35,000 Elvis got $5,000. He began recording at RCA’s studios in Nashville, Tennessee, with a somewhat larger group of musicians but still including Moore, Black, and Fontana and began to create a national sensation with a series of hits: “ Heartbreak Hotel,” “Don’t Be Cruel,” “Love Me Tender” (all 1956), "All Shook Up" (1957), and more.

From 1956 through 1958 he completely dominated the best-seller charts and ushered in the age of rock and roll, opening doors for both white and Black rock artists. His television appearances, especially those on Ed Sullivan’s Sunday night variety show, set records for the size of the audiences. Even his films, a few slight vehicles, were box office smashes.

Presley became the teen idol of his decade, greeted everywhere by screaming hordes of young women, and, when it was announced in early 1958 that he had been drafted and would enter the U.S. Army, there was that rarest of all pop culture events, a moment of true grief. More important, he served as the great cultural catalyst of his period. Elvis projected a mixed vision of humility and self-confidence, of intense commitment and comic disbelief in his ability to inspire frenzy. He inspired literally thousands of musicians—initially those more or less like-minded Southerners, from Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins on down, who were the first generation of rockabillies, and, later, people who had far different combinations of musical and cultural influences and ambitions. From John Lennon to Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan to Prince, it was impossible to think of a rock star of any importance who did not owe an explicit debt to Presley.

Beyond even that, Presley inspired his audience. “It was like he whispered his dream in all our ears and then we dreamed it,” said Springsteen at the time of Presley’s death. You did not have to want to be a rock and roll star or even a musician to want to be like Elvis—which meant, ultimately, to be free and uninhibited and yet still a part of the everyday. Literally millions of people—an entire generation or two—defined their sense of personal style and ambition in terms that Elvis first personified.

As a result, he was anything but universally adored. Those who did not worship him found him despicable (no one found him ignorable). Preachers and pundits declared him an anathema, his Pentecostally derived hip-swinging stage style and breathy vocal asides obscene. Racists denounced him for mingling Black music with white (and Presley was always scrupulous in crediting his Black sources, one of the things that made him different from the Tin Pan Alley writers and singers who had for decades lifted Black styles without credit). He was pronounced responsible for all teenage hooliganism and juvenile delinquency. Yet, in every appearance on television, he appeared affable, polite, and soft-spoken, almost shy. It was only with a band at his back and a beat in his ear that he became “Elvis the Pelvis.”

In 1960 Presley returned from the army, where he had served as a soldier in Germany rather than joining the Special Services entertainment division. Those who regarded him as commercial hype without talent expected him to fade away. Instead, he continued to have hits from recordings stockpiled just before he entered the army. Upon his return to the States, he picked up pretty much where he had left off, churning out a series of more than 30 movies (from Blue Hawaii [1961] to Change of Habit [1969]) over the next eight years, almost none of which fit any genre other than “Elvis movie,” which meant a light comedic romance with musical interludes. Most had accompanying soundtrack albums, and together the movies and the records made him a rich man, although they nearly ruined him as any kind of artist. Presley did his best work in the 1960s on singles either unconnected to the films or only marginally stuck into them, recordings such as “It’s Now or Never (‘O Sole Mio’)" (1960), “Are You Lonesome Tonight?,” “ Little Sister” (both 1961), “Can’t Help Falling in Love,” “ Return to Sender” (both 1962), and “ Viva Las Vegas” (1964). Presley was no longer a controversial figure he had become one more predictable mass entertainer, a personage of virtually no interest to the rock audience that had expanded so much with the advent of the new sounds of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Dylan.

By 1968 the changes in the music world had overtaken Presley—both movie grosses and record sales had fallen. In December his one-man Christmas TV special aired a tour de force of rock and roll and rhythm and blues, it restored much of his dissipated credibility. In 1969 he released a single having nothing to do with a film, “ Suspicious Minds” it went to number one. He also began doing concerts again and quickly won back a sizable following, although it was not nearly as universal as his audience in the 1950s—in the main, it was Southern and Midwestern, working-class and unsophisticated, and overwhelmingly female. For much of the next decade, he was again one of the top live attractions in the United States. (For a variety of reasons, he never performed outside North America.) Presley was now a mainstream American entertainer, an icon but not so much an idol. He had married in 1967 without much furor, became a parent with the birth of his daughter, Lisa Marie, in 1968, and got divorced in 1973. He made no more movies, although there was a good concert film, Elvis on Tour. His recordings were of uneven quality, but on each album he included a song or two that had focus and energy. Hits were harder to come by—“Suspicious Minds” was his last number one and “ Burning Love” (1972) his final Top Ten entry. But, thanks to the concerts, spectaculars best described by critic Jon Landau as an apotheosis of American musical comedy, he remained a big money earner. He now lacked the ambition and power of his early work, but that may have been a good thing—he never seemed a dated relic of the 1950s trying to catch up to trends but was just a performer, unrelentingly himself.

However, Presley had also developed a lethal lifestyle. Spending almost all his time when not on the road in Graceland, his Memphis estate (actually just a big Southern colonial house decorated somewhere between banal modernity and garish faux-Vegas opulence), he lived nocturnally, surrounded by sycophants and stuffed with greasy foods and a variety of prescription drugs. His shows deteriorated in the final two years of his life, and his recording career came to a virtual standstill. Presley never seemed confident in his status, never entirely certain that he would not collapse back into sharecropper poverty, and, as a result, he seems to have become immobilized the man who had risked everything, including potential ridicule, to make himself a success now lived in the lockstep regimen of an addict and recluse. Finally, in the summer of 1977, the night before he was to begin yet another concert tour, he died of a heart attack brought on largely by drug abuse. He was 42 years old.

Almost immediately upon hearing of his death, mourners from around the world gathered at Graceland to say farewell to the poor boy who had lived out the American dream. In a way, that mourning has never ceased: Graceland remains one of the country’s top tourist attractions, and Presley’s albums and other artifacts continue to sell briskly. Each August crowds flock to Graceland to honour him on the anniversary not of his birth but of his death. From time to time rumours cropped up that he did not really die, that his death was a fake designed to free him from fame. Elvis impersonators are legion. His biggest fans—working-class white women, almost exclusively—passed their fanaticism on to their children, or at least to a surprising number of daughters. “Elvis has left the building,” but those who are still inside have decided to carry on regardless. Once more, Elvis Presley is triumphant, although this triumph is shadowed by something far less than happiness.


What Presley family records will you find?

There are 51,000 census records available for the last name Presley. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Presley census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1,000 immigration records available for the last name Presley. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 12,000 military records available for the last name Presley. For the veterans among your Presley ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 51,000 census records available for the last name Presley. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Presley census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1,000 immigration records available for the last name Presley. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 12,000 military records available for the last name Presley. For the veterans among your Presley ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Operational history [ edit ]

The vessel ' s keel was laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd. at their yard in Orange, Texas on 6 June 1944. The destroyer escort was launched on 19 August 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Willie Lynn Presley, and commissioned on 7 November 1944, Lt. Comdr. Richard S. Paret, USNR, in command.

After shakedown off Bermuda, Presley transited the Panama Canal 24 January 1945 and proceeded to Pearl Harbor for further training. She arrived at Noumea 22 March, and departed 3 May to escort a group of transports to Leyte Gulf. She subsequently paused at Manus, Saipan, and Ulithi before making two trips to Okinawa. The end of the war found her anchored in Ulithi Harbor.


Elvis Presley dies

Popular music icon Elvis Presley dies in Memphis, Tennessee. He was 42. The death of the “King of Rock and Roll” brought legions of mourning fans to Graceland, his mansion in Memphis. Doctors said he died of a heart attack, likely brought on by his addiction to prescription barbiturates.

Elvis Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi, on January 8, 1935. His twin brother, Jesse, died during the birth. Elvis grew up dirt-poor in Tupelo and Memphis and found work as a truck driver after high school. When he was 19, he walked into a Memphis recording studio and paid $4 to record a few songs as a present to his mother. Sam Philips, the owner of the studio, was intrigued by the rough, soulful quality of his voice and invited Presley back to practice with some local musicians. After Philips heard Elvis sing the rhythm-and-blues song “That’s All Right,” which Presley imbued with an accessible country-and-western flavor, he agreed to release the rendition as a single on his Sun Records label. The recording went to the top of the local charts, and Presley’s career was launched.

During the next year, Elvis attracted a growing following in the South, and in 1955 Sun Records sold his contract to a major record label, the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), for a record $40,000. His first record for RCA was “Heartbreak Hotel,” which made him a national sensation in early 1956. He followed this up with the double-sided hit record “Hound Dog”/𠇝on’t Be Cruel.” In September 1956, Elvis appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show, a national variety television show, and teenagers went into hysterics over his dynamic stage presence, good looks, and simple but catchy songs. Many parents, however, were appalled by his sexually suggestive pelvic gyrations, and by his third appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, Elvis was filmed from only the waist up.

From 1956 through 1958, Elvis dominated the music charts and ushered in the age of rock and roll, opening doors for both white and black rock artists. During this period, he starred in four successful motion pictures, all of which featured his soundtracks: Love Me Tender (1956), Jailhouse Rock (1957), Loving You (1957), and King Creole (1958).

In 1958, Presley was drafted into the U.S. Army and served an 18-month tour of duty in West Germany as a Jeep driver. Teenage girls were overcome with grief, but Elvis’ manager, Colonel Tom Parker, kept American youth satiated with stockpiled recordings that Presley made before his departure. All five singles released during this period eventually became million-sellers.

After being discharged as a sergeant in 1960, Elvis underwent a style change, eschewing edgy, rhythm-and-blues-inspired material in favor of romantic, dramatic ballads such as 𠇊re You Lonesome Tonight?” He retired from concerts to concentrate on his musical films, and he made 27 in the 1960s, including G.I. Blues (1960), Blue Hawaii (1961), Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962), Viva Las Vegas (1964), and Frankie and Johnny (1966). In 1967, he married Priscilla Beaulieu, and the couple had a daughter, Lisa Marie, in 1968.

By the end of the 1960s, rock and roll had undergone dramatic changes, and Elvis was no longer seen as relevant by American youth. A 1968 television special won back many of his fans, but hits were harder to come by. His final Top 10 entry, 𠇋urning Love,” was in 1972. Still, he maintained his sizable fortune through lucrative concert and television appearances.

By the mid 1970s, Elvis was in declining physical and mental health. He divorced his wife in 1973 and developed a dangerous dependence on prescription drugs. He was also addicted to junk food and gained considerable weight. In the last two years of his life, he made erratic stage appearances and lived nearly as a recluse. On the afternoon of August 16, 1977, he was found unconscious in his Graceland mansion and rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He was buried on the grounds of Graceland, which continues to attract fans and has been turned into a highly successful tourist attraction.


Cybill Shepherd

Although they didn’t date for too long, Cybill Shepherd was lucky enough to go out with Elvis. While making an appearance on Sway in the Morning in May 2016, the Moonlighting star opened up about their fun-filled dates. “He’s a really wonderful, sexy, incredible guy,” she gushed a the time.

“He’d rent one of the big theaters out until midnight,” she also once told Closer.


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Comeback

While Presley was busy making movies, other musicians took the stage, some of whom, including the Beatles, sold lots of records and threatened to make Presley share his title of "King of Rock 'n' Roll,"—if not steal it. Presley had to do something to keep his crown.

In December 1968, he dressed in black leather and made an hour-long television special titled "Elvis." Calm, sexy, and humorous, he wowed the crowd. The "comeback special" energized Presley. He returned to recording songs and doing live performances. In July 1969, Parker booked Presley at the largest venue in Las Vegas, the new International Hotel. His shows were huge successes and the hotel booked Presley for four weeks a year through 1974. The rest of the year he toured.


Elvis came to Las Vegas 50 years ago and history was made

Let’s bow to The King, who 50 years ago this month kicked off a historic series of shows in Las Vegas — and its first residency.

pologies to Celine, Elton, Britney, Gaga and all the others who’ve committed to performing a regular schedule of shows in Las Vegas, but let’s bow to The King, who 50 years ago this month kicked off a historic series of shows in Las Vegas — and its first residency. A VIP-only gig on July 31, 1969, marked the first show in what would become a seven-year-long residency at the International Hotel (which later became the Las Vegas Hilton and is now the Westgate). By his death in 1977, Elvis Presley had performed more than 600 — maybe even more than 800 — shows there, all of them sold-out. The shows encompass a defining arc of Elvis’ career, not only including the vital performer coming off of the acclaimed 1968 “comeback special,” but the final years of Elvis’ life, when pop culture consensus was that he had become a parody of his former performing self.

Richard Zoglin, author of “Elvis in Vegas: How The King Reinvented the Las Vegas Show” (Simon & Schuster, $28), argues that Elvis’ shows changed Las Vegas entertainment, ushering in a rock ‘n’ roll sensibility here that continues today.

Here are 50 notes of the exciting, historic, ultimately melancholy melody that was The King’s Las Vegas reign.

1 — RCA Records announced the first show with a nine-page release that began: “On July 31, 1969, a tall, rangy, handsome and gifted singer-actor-performer will make his first appearance before a live audience in more than a decade when he steps on to the stage of the new International Hotel in Las Vegas. His name is Elvis Presley, and because of the evocative magic of those four simple syllables, his appearances at the International take on a special emotional as well as astonishing statistical meaning for millions of Americans, both teenagers and adults.”

2 — By 1969, the 34-year-old had sold more than 250 million records during 15 years with RCA. His recording of “Hound Dog” had sold more than 7 million copies since its 1956 release, and Elvis had starred in 32 movies, earned 47 single gold records and 10 gold albums.

3 — Elvis’ recorded voice had “been heard by more people in the world than that of any other performing artist in the history of the recording industry,” according to RCA, and the International contract would make him “one of the highest-paid performers in the history of Las Vegas.”

4 —Elvis’ contract with the International paid $100,000 a week for a four-week engagement, according to Zoglin. That matched what Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin were making, putting all three at the top of Las Vegas’ entertainer pay scale.

5 —The shows weren’t Elvis’ first performances in Las Vegas. In 1956, he played the New Frontier’s Venus Room, which billed him as “the atomic powered singer.” Elvis was listed as an “extra added attraction,” sharing the bill with Freddy Martin and his orchestra.

6 — Critical reaction to that New Frontier lounge appearance was tepid and colored with skepticism about Elvis’ chances of success in Las Vegas.

7 —“For the teen-agers, the long, tall Memphis lad is a whiz for the average Vegas spender or showgoer, a bore. His musical sound with a combo of three is uncouth, matching to a great extent the lyric content of his nonsensical songs,” wrote the Las Vegas Sun’s Bill Willard.

My girlfriend and I were stunned … we started screaming. I thought, ‘That’s really him. This is not a TV, this is not my record player … I don’t remember the songs he sang. Just the way his hair was absolutely gorgeous, the way the light shined off of it.

Sue Lorenz, Viva Las Vegas Elvis Presley fan club president, who saw Elvis at the International Hotel and Las Vegas Hilton 15 times between February 1970, when she was 12, including his last show here in December 1976.

8 —Elvis held no grudge against Las Vegas. In 1963, he filmed “Viva Las Vegas” here, and on May 1, 1967, he married Priscilla Beaulieu at the Aladdin.

9 — “Viva Las Vegas” was considered by many fans and critics to be among his best films. Elvis confidant Joe Esposito told the Review-Journal in 2014 that “Viva Las Vegas,” which memorably co-starred Ann-Margret, was one of Elvis’ favorite films.

1 0 — The International shows would come just eight months after Elvis’ critically acclaimed TV special, which aired in December 1968. Officially called “Singer Presents Elvis,” it is widely known as “the comeback special.”

1 1 —The special drew “a whopping 42 percent of the viewing audience,” Zoglin notes, and it revealed an earthy, charismatic Elvis, helping to reignite interest in the performer.

1 2 —But first, Elvis had to take care of a final bit of cinematic business: In early 1969, he filmed “Change of Habit,” a drama in which he played a hip, inner-city doctor who fell for a nun (honest!) played by Mary Tyler Moore.

1 3 — On July 13, 1969, about two weeks before opening night, the RJ reported that Presley’s monthlong set of shows was 80 percent sold out.

1 4 —The International, which opened July 1, 1969, was then the world’s largest hotel-casino at 30 stories tall, with just over 1,500 rooms, and with a showroom that seated about 1,150.

(My band) opened the Landmark across the street from the International Hotel. Elvis and his band were all good friends of ours and also customers of our family’s restaurant. … It was like when Frank Sinatra electrified when he came to town. A very similar dynamic. … We always say Frank taught us how to swing and Elvis taught us how to rock.

Lorraine Hunt-Bono, former Nevada lieutenant governor and Clark County commissioner who in 1969 was leader of The Lauri Perry Four and attended Elvis’ opening night show

1 5 —Elvis didn’t open the Showroom Internationale. That distinction goes to Barbra Streisand, on July 2, 1969. According to Zoglin, Elvis’ manager, Colonel Tom Parker, deemed it too risky for Elvis to open a new showroom with all the technical glitches that might bring.

1 6 —Elvis saw Streisand perform the second-to-last show of her engagement, and according to Zoglin, “Midway through the show he turned to one of his Memphis pals and muttered, ‘She sucks.’ ”

1 7 —A full-page RJ ad announced the other performers on Elvis’ bill: Comedian (and longtime Las Vegas resident) Sammy Shore, the Sweet Inspirations, the Imperials and the Bobby Morris Orchestra. The ad also named James Burton (guitar), Jerry Scheff (electric bass), Larry Muhoberac (piano), John Wilkinson (guitar) and Ronnie Tutt (drums). The bottom of the ad read: “This announcement courtesy of Elvis and the Colonel.”

1 8 —Fun trivia: The Sweet Inspirations was co-founded by Cissy Houston, Whitney Houston’s mom, and the group recorded with a stellar roster of artists including Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin and Van Morrison.

1 9 —The band lineup changed as Elvis’ tenure at the International continued, filling what became known as The TCB Band (for “taking care of business”).

2 0 —Elvis’ contract called for him to play two shows a night, at 8 p.m. and midnight. Tickets began at $15, “top of the Vegas scale at the time,” Zoglin writes.

2 1 — The early show was a dinner show, and the midnight show included drinks. Included on the July 1969 Showroom Internationale menu: Roast sirloin with pommes parisienne, tomate au gratin and Parfait Internationale.

2 2 — Opening night’s audience reportedly included Fats Domino, Sammy Davis Jr., Tom Jones, Ann-Margret, George Hamilton, Paul Anka, Pat Boone, Carol Channing, Juliet Prowse (who co-starred with Elvis in “G.I. Blues”) and Henry Mancini.

2 3 — VIPs even got a “welcome gift box,” which included two Elvis albums, a 1969 pocket calendar, two 8-by-10 Elvis photos, a color photo of Elvis, a brochure of Elvis records and tapes, a press release and a stat sheet.

2 4 —Sammy Davis Jr. got an extra souvenir. According to Graceland’s blog, Davis, who sat in the front row, was given one of Elvis’ rings, right from the stage, by Elvis.

2 5 —The opening night set list included “Blue Suede Shoes,” “All Shook Up,” “Love Me Tender,” “Jailhouse Rock,” “Don’t Be Cruel,” “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Hound Dog.”

2 6 — In retrospect, it’s surprising that the list didn’t include “Viva Las Vegas,” the title song from the movie, which still is the closest thing Las Vegas has to a theme song.

2 7 — The premiere show ran about an hour and 15 minutes.

(A member of Elvis’ entourage) showed me where Elvis stood in the wings before he’d come out. He’d have his guys hold him back, almost as if they were preventing him from getting onstage, so when he came out he’d come out with a big flourish … He was moving forward so he’d build up a big head of steam and bound out onto the stage.

Ira David Sternberg, Las Vegas Hilton vice president of communications and community relations from 2004-2009, host of “Talk About Las Vegas”

2 8 — Elvis was a hit, and the reviews were great. According to Zoglin, Billboard’s review was headlined “Elvis Retains Touch in Return to Stage.” Variety called Elvis “very much in command.” And The New York Times’ rock critic enthused that Elvis “still knows how to sing rock ‘n’ roll.”

2 9 — The opening-night show was such a hit that Parker and International president Alex Shoofey quickly negotiated another contract on a tablecloth in the hotel’s coffee shop.

3 0 —During that first engagement, which ended Aug. 28, 1969, Elvis performed 57 shows, all of which sold out.

3 1 —Elvis drew 101,500 people over the that run — a Las Vegas record — and gross ticket receipts totaled $1.5 million, according to Zoglin.

3 2 —At the time, Las Vegas shows typically were considered loss leaders. Zoglin writes that Elvis’ reportedly were the first shows to make money, ushering in a new Las Vegas business model.

3 3 —The tablecloth deal called for Elvis to appear at the International for two four-week engagements a year over the next five years. For that, Elvis would be paid $125,000 a week.

3 4 — When Elvis performed here, he lived in a 5,000-square-foot suite on the International’s 30th floor. It has been altered in the years since, and no longer looks the same.

There were parties almost every night in the Elvis suite, but they were not loud, crazy, alcohol-infused parties. … Somebody was always stopping over from another hotel, whether it was Tom Jones or Steve (Lawrence) and Eydie (Gorme). The only ones who never came over were the Rat Pack.

Dominic Parisi, Westgate executive casino host, who tended to Elvis from 1972 to 1976, as a room service staffer

3 5 — During shows, Elvis would wipe his brow with silk scarves that he’d kiss and give to female fans. Those scarves were designed and painted at Opportunity Village, the Las Vegas nonprofit, which provided Elvis’ scarves until the day he died.

3 6 — In October 1969, RCA released a live recording of the Las Vegas show, “In Person at the International Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada,” as part of a double-album set called “From Memphis to Vegas/From Vegas to Memphis.”

3 7 — It was Elvis’ first live recording, and Las Vegans could get it at the local Woolco for $5.49 (“a $9.98 value”).

3 8 — Fans who felt particularly inspired by Elvis also could visit Woolco to buy a “folk guitar outfit” for $8.97, reduced from the regular price of $12.97.

3 9 — Zoglin said the International shows created a new customer base for Las Vegas, not the sort of high rollers and table game players that the Rat Pack drew, but of middle-Americans and those who otherwise might not have come here.

4 0 — Elvis’ second engagement at the International began on Jan. 26, 1970, and it was as popular as the first. The third was in August 1970. An August 1970 show was filmed and became the documentary “Elvis: That’s the Way It Is.” Released in November of that year, the film features Elvis singing several numbers and records a rehearsal session.

4 1 — Elvis is recognizable by a single name, but the hotel he played changed its name several times over the years. Opening as the International, it became the Las Vegas Hilton and then the LVH before becoming the Westgate in 2014.

4 2 — Elvis performed his last show at the then-Las Vegas Hilton on Dec. 12, 1976. Elvis was found dead in a bathroom of his home at Graceland on Aug. 16, 1977, at age 42.

4 3 — Exactly how many shows Elvis performed here is, surprisingly, debatable. According to the Hilton, he performed 837 shows between July 31, 1969, and Dec. 12, 1976, all of them sellouts, to an estimated audience of 2.5 million people.

4 4 — After a review several years ago, Graceland revised the total to 636.

He had a phenomenal rapport with the audience. He’d take off scarves and give them to women, and women would charge the stage like a feeding frenzy. He was just fun to watch. He was a great entertainer, even when he was bursting out of his jumpsuit.

David Siegel, founder of Westgate Resorts, who knew Colonel Tom Parker and saw Elvis about 15 times at the International and Las Vegas Hilton

4 5 — Whatever the number, the Hilton honored the record-breaking streak with the installation in September 1978 of a statue that now sits near the Westgate’s front desk. Hilton President Barron Hilton, Priscilla Presley and Vernon Presley, Elvis’ father, attended the ceremony.

4 6 — About 2,000 fans also attended, the RJ reported, and Priscilla described the statue as looking “very much like” Elvis.

4 7 — Elvis’ relationship with Las Vegas continues. In 2016, a portion of Riviera Boulevard was renamed Elvis Presley Boulevard, and Southern Nevada also is home to Elvis Presley Court and Elvis Alive Drive.

4 8 — Elvis also received a star on the Las Vegas Walk of Stars in 2008.

4 9 — Elvis was a Las Vegas game-changer. Zoglin writes that Elvis at the International “established a new template for the Las Vegas show: No longer an intimate, sophisticated, Sinatra-style nightclub act, but a big rock-concert-like spectacle.”

5 0 — Elvis’ shows also altered the way Las Vegas entertainment is consumed, Zoglin says, as “people began to schedule their trips to Vegas around Elvis shows, rather than coming to town and then choosing from available shows.

Contact John Przybys at [email protected] or 702-383-0280. Follow @JJPrzybys on Twitter.

Book signing

Richard Zoglin, author of “Elvis in Vegas: How The King Reinvented the Las Vegas Show,” will be in Las Vegas Aug. 2 for a presentation and book signing at the Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Road.

The event will begin at 7 p.m. A signing and reception will follow Zoglin’s talk, and The Writer’s Block wll be selling books at the door.

The event is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first come, first served basis. For more information, call 702-507-3459.


Graceland

Presley&aposs Memphis home, Graceland, is open to the public, and numerous fans from around the world visit the legendary residence annually, especially around Presley&aposs birthday and the anniversary of his death.

Thousands of fans traveled to Graceland on August 16, 2012 — the 35th anniversary of Presley&aposs death — for a special vigil in honor of the King of Rock &aposn&apos Roll. During the gathering, fans held lit candles and stood outside of Presley&aposs home. Though the Presley family holds a tribute event each year to mark the anniversary of Presley&aposs death, the 2012 gathering was unique: Presley&aposs estranged wife, Priscilla, and daughter Lisa Marie appeared together for the first time at the annual event.

"You should see this from our point-of-view. It&aposs amazing," Priscilla said during the event, according to the Washington Post. "The candles are lit. It&aposs truly a sight to behold . This is something that Elvis would never, ever have believed could have taken place here."


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